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About Hypnosis - Part 1

What is Hypnosis - Part 2

Ultradian Rhythms - Part 3

How to Use Hypnosis - Part 4

Dreaming - Part 5

Self Hypnosis - Part 6

Trance - Part 7

Negative Hypnosis - Part 8

Using Hypnosis - Part 9

Hypnosis Exercise - Part 10

Counselling - Part 11

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Learn Hypnosis at Home

What does it feel like to be in a trance?

It is a common misconception that trance is a state of unconsciousness like sleep or being in a coma.

In hypnosis you are often consciously aware of your thoughts and surroundings. However, you may still be pleasantly surprised by an unconscious response such as a 'hand levitation' or a pleasant memory springing to mind. This is similar to the way in which we might be ‘surprised' by a giggling fit or blushing (also unconscious responses).

The most accurate description of the hypnotic state is a ‘parallel awareness'. The hypnotized person knows who and where they are, but is also strongly focused on internal realities such as sensations, memories or imagination.

Occasionally after trance, a person may have little recollection of the content of the trance itself. This ‘amnesia' occurs in the same way that it does when you awake from a dream. Often you are aware that you have had a dream, but can’t remember what it was.

To learn more about how to do hypnosis and what it feels like, you may like to have a look at our Hypnosis DVD.

The following are all examples of trance states:

  • Anger

  • Depression

  • High Anxiety or Panic

  • Obsessive or Compulsive Behaviour

  • Addictive Behaviour
If you narrow down your focus of attention onto something that scares or depresses you for an extended period, you will not feel good!

It has been shown that people with phobias are almost always great hypnotic subjects! If they weren’t, they wouldn’t be able to create and maintain a phobic response as it requires a narrowed focus of attention.

The phobia acts just like a ‘post hypnotic suggestion' on a stage show. The hypnotist says ‘When I click my fingers, you’ll dance like Elvis' The spider says ‘When you see me, you’ll have a high anxiety response'

Next, Negative Hypnosis

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Roger Elliott
Managing Director